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Memoirs The Earl of Woolton

Memoirs

The Earl of Woolton

Published 1959
ISBN :
Hardcover
452 pages
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 About the Book 

Lord Woolton is one of those rarest of men- one who has been able to turn his hand with equal—and extraordinary—skill to a succession of careers of startling diversity. Frederick Marquis the sociologist was born when, living with a group of friendsMoreLord Woolton is one of those rarest of men- one who has been able to turn his hand with equal—and extraordinary—skill to a succession of careers of startling diversity. Frederick Marquis the sociologist was born when, living with a group of friends in Liverpools dock area, his next-door neighbour died of malnutrition. The tragedy of anyone having to live in such poverty so shocked him that he then and there started what he calls his search for poverty- his quest for the causes of and the cure for this misery. The young sociologist proved himself in the David Lewis Organization in Liverpool, creating welfare centres and improving dock labour conditions.The qualities which made the successful businessman as well as the brilliant organizer and administrator were first demonstrated in the authors masterly handling of the vital boot industry during the first World War. With the coming of peace Louis Cohen invited him to join the firm of Lewiss, a North Country store chain. This was a true recognition of his talents, for Frederick Marquis was the first man to help run Lewiss who was neither a Cohen nor a Jew. 1939 again found him at the head of a department of government under the stress of war. As Minister of Food his magnificent handling of the monstrous problem of feeding a nation will never be forgotten. Later, as Minister of Reconstruction, Lord Woolton helped the country to pick up the threads of peace.Membership of the War Cabinet had thrown him into the political arena against his will, but when the Labour Party was returned to power in 1945 the once-reluctant politician plunged whole-heartedly into his fourth career. As Chairman of the Conservative Party Organization, his institution of large-scale recruiting campaigns and other strategy paid ample dividends, as shown in the greatly reduced Labour majority in 1950 and its disappearance a year later. Before his retirement and elevation to a richly deserved earldom, Lord Woolton became successively Lord President of the Council and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. Few men have been able to match such a record, combining versatility and greatness to a remarkable degree- fewer still to surpass it.